Archive for the board game Category

Roll Player Game Review

Posted in board game, Product Review with tags , , on January 9, 2019 by boccobsblog

At GameHoleCon in November we had the the pleasure of trying Roll Player, by Thunderworks Games.

According to their website:

Mighty heroes don’t just appear out of thin air — you must create them! Race, class, alignment, skills, traits, and equipment are all elements of the perfect hero, who is ready to take on all opposition in the quest for glory and riches.

In Roll Player, you will compete to create the greatest fantasy adventurer who has ever lived, preparing your character to embark on an epic quest. Roll and draft dice to build up your character’s attributes. Purchase weapons and armor to outfit your hero. Train to gain skills and discover your hero’s traits to prepare them for their journey. Earn Reputation Stars by constructing the perfect character.

The player with the greatest Reputation wins the game and will surely triumph over whatever nefarious plot lies ahead!

Roll Player
Players: 1-4
Time: 60-90 minutes
Ages: 10+
Rules: PDF

What’s included:
• 1 Rulebook
• 6 Character Sheets
• 73 Dice
10 Green
10 Blue
10 Red
10 Purple
10 Black
10 White
13 Gold
• 1 Dice Bag
• 101 Cards
4 Player Aid / Reputation Track Cards
6 Class Cards
16 Backstory Cards
17 Alignment Cards
53 Market Cards
5 Initiative Cards
• 55 Gold Tokens
• 12 Tracking Tokens (2 in each Class Color)
• 6 Charisma Tokens

What I enjoyed:

  • There are several win conditions
  • The game allows multiple play styles (cooperative or cooperative)
  • Well thought out alignment system that rewards and punishes your choices
  • Roll Player has some great art
  • There are several character classes and races to choose from

All in all, Roll Player is a fun game and I recommend it. The rules are well thought out, and there was a lot time put into the game’s creation. I enjoyed bringing my sociopath frogkin ranger to life. Learn more about Thunderworks games at their website.


Buy me an 1/18 of a cup of coffee
D&D 5E Core Rulebook Gift Set
Dungeon Mayhem – D&D Card Game
Guildmasters’ Guide to Ravnica
Waterdeep: Dragon Heist

Danger the Game

Posted in board game, Interview with tags , , , on November 7, 2018 by boccobsblog

Danger2

Danger the Game

I had the pleasure of running into some of the game from Origami Whale Games at FlatCon this year and we had a chance to discuss their latest project, Danger the Game. Here is an interview with OW’s Daniel Kim.

What can you tell us about Danger the Game?

Hopefully quite a bit! Danger the Game is the storytelling party game of bizarre dangers and rescues. I, personally, like to think of it as a preparation kit for the unknown. One doesn’t EXPECT to get hugged by a depressed giant squid but it certainly doesn’t hurt to be ready just in case!

Danger

How do you play?
Ah, yes, the rescues. So one of the players, the victim, finds themselves being hugged by a depressed giant squid. The others would use one of the three skills and three tools from their hand to try and come up with a rescue plan. For example, someone could be a professional balloon sculpture artist with a pet rock that knows every trick. Well, being a professional balloon sculpture artist, it’s a simple task to make a giant squid balloon piloted by a versatile pet rock- skilled even in the ways of comfort. OBJECTION! The other rescuers might poke holes in a story or play plot twist cards to mess up the Danger, the Skill or the Tool. The story changes drastically if that Pet Rock suddenly has too many self destruct buttons!
Once each of the rescuers has told their rescue plan the victim chooses a victor for the round by awarding them the Danger card ensuring that we will never forget their heroic exploits.
How many frenemies do you need to play?
You need at least two frenemies unless you also count yourself as a frenemy! Then three, you need three people total to play the game.
How long does a standard game take?
I would say on average 30 min. to 1 hr. Some people are great at quick, daring, expediently told rescues, others can be more long-winded. In consequence, I’ve played some remarkably short games well under the 30 minutes listed on the box but time will really fly sometimes! My recommendation is that if you’re playing with 6 or more people, swap out the victory requirement to only two Dangers instead of the usual three.
How likely am I to get stabbed during a game?
Geez! I didn’t think I would ever need to make this disclaimer but DON’T PLAY WITH PEOPLE WHO ARE LIKELY TO STAB YOU!
Where can we get a copy of Danger the Game?
Right now the best place to find us is smile.amazon.com so that 0.5% of the purchase goes to a charity of your choice (I support “The Jack Vasel Memorial Fund” myself)
Is there anything you’d like to add?
Yeah, there’s a lot I didn’t expect going into this project. I’ve played… a lot of Danger, hundreds of games of Danger and the funny thing is… I still haven’t grown tired of it. I mean, I know I kind of have to say that since I helped make it and all but it’s been an incredible experience sitting down with strangers from all over and hearing new stories every time. I’ve been told that Danger is a great way to get people into role playing and I suppose that a role playing game is what it is. All I can say is that I’ve benefited from the ways people look at these cards and I definitely look at my d20 encounters differently than I used to.
Who would win in a knife fight, Danger the Game or Settlers of Catan?
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…it was close.

Learn more at origamiwhalegames.com and pick up a copy today!

Letters from Whitechapel

Posted in board game, Product Review with tags , , , , , , , on August 13, 2010 by boccobsblog

At Gen Con, we got a chance to demo several new and exciting games. One of them was a thrilling detective game, Letters from Whitechapel. The game is set in London in 1888 during the killing spree of Jack the Ripper. One character controls Jack while the others play constables trying to arrest him.

How does it work? The game board (a period map of Whitechapel) is covered in more than one hundred numbered circles, and each of these circles is a possible hiding place for Jack. The players go in turn moving about the board investigating the numbered scenes, while Jack moves about the board unseen (the players have visible game pieces, but Jack denotes his movements on a notepad and has no game piece).  The detectives must use strategy and a fair bit of luck as they work together to catch Jack before the fifteenth night, after which he escapes and wins the game.

What I really liked about the game is the amount of detail the designer put into it. The game board looks like an actual period map, and the five murders happen at the historically accurate place on the map. Each of the detective cards (used to determine who leads the investigation each turn) denotes an actual picture of a Scotland Yard detective that worked the case.

The detail that truly impressed me was that on the third “night” of the game, Jack kills two of his five victims. This detail closely follows the actual events of September 30, 1888, when The Ripper killed Liz Stride (but was interrupted), and then killed Catherine Eddowes in the same night. When I saw that detail, it was clear to me that the designers had done their homework on the Ripper murders.

My only complaint, and it is a small one, was that the game pieces that represent the detectives were a bit lame. I would give the game a four out of five.

The game requires 2-6 players, and takes about 90 minutes to complete. It is available from the Nexus Games website.

-Andy